The Catlin Project, a successful water project now in its second year, stands on the research done for the first Pilot Project of the Super Ditch Project.

The Catlin Project, a successful water project now in its second year, stands on the research done for the first Pilot Project of the Super Ditch Project. Jack Goble, engineer with the Lower Arkansas River Water Conservancy District, explained how the project works for the directors at Wednesday's meeting.

Six Catlin Canal farms totaling 902 acres and 1,047 shares may fallow up to 30 percent of their land and are set to deliver 500 acre-feet per year to the municipalities of Fowler, Fountain and Security. Of the farms on the Catlin, 238 acres are currently fallow out of 902 total (26 percent fallowed). Dry-up shares were delivered to three locations: Schweizer Recharge Pond, Hanagan Recharge Pond and Timpas Creek Augmentation Station. Crooked Arroyo Augmentation Station was not used in 2016.

The augmentation ponds and the augmentation stations enable the project to utilize the pay-as-you-go method of meeting future return flow obligations by placing adequate water in the recharge now, said Goble. In answer to a question from farmer Dave Donnell of Higbee about buildup of silt in the ponds, Goble said the ponds were ripped two feet deep and they do have to keep an eye on buildup in the ponds.

Attorney Peter Nichols was complimentary to the plan and how successful it has been. He intends to schedule Goble to appear at the Water Congress in January. There will also be an article in Water Reports in CU Water. Nichols hopes the success of this project will pave the way for future similar projects. It wasn't easy, with the first proposition in 2004 having been turned down, but supplying the data to get the Catlin Project approved in 2014, with outstanding success in 2015 and 2016.