A crew of Federal Emergency Management Agency officials may have been in the area assessing flood damage on Thursday, but they weren’t the ones trying to get into homes. Those were the scam artists, Quincy police say.

A crew of Federal Emergency Management Agency officials may have been in the area assessing flood damage on Thursday, but they weren’t the ones trying to get into homes.


Those were the scam artists.


Police sent an advisory Thursday that a man and a woman posing as representatives from the emergency management agency were on Farrington Street asking to inspect the insides of houses.


City officials said FEMA teams were not looking inside homes during their Thursday visit, and were at all times accompanied by city personnel.


“At this point, there’s nobody canvassing the city for anything like that,” Police Chief Paul Keenan said. “At this point it’s premature for them to be out there, and we don’t believe it’s legitimate.”


Keenan said the pair in question were driving in a van with Florida plates. Unlike officials, they did not appear to be carrying identification badges.


Residents who were approached did not allow the pair to enter the home, Keenan said.


Officials are urging residents to exercise caution and ask for official credentials if they are approached in a similar fashion.


The apparent scam was not the only instance of flood-related opportunism police with which police have been dealing.


A 200-pound city water pump disappeared from Alrick Road on Monday as crews were scrambling to bring down the water level there.


A witness saw a truck pull up and two people load the pump inside. Police investigated, and the pump was recovered after it was determined someone who lived nearby took it to clear a basement with the intent of returning it to city. No charges will be brought.


“We’re looking at it as a misunderstanding,” Quincy Police Capt. John Dougan said.


Patriot Ledger writer Jack Encarnacao may be reached at jencarnacao@ledger.com.