Celebrity chef Kent Rollins and his wife Shannon are bringing one of their immensely popular five-day cowboy cooking schools to southeastern Colorado later this spring.

Celebrity chef Kent Rollins and his wife Shannon are bringing one of their immensely popular five-day cowboy cooking schools to southeastern Colorado later this spring.

Though their gigs sell out well in advance, those who are interested can get their name on a waiting list. Details are available at KentRollins.com.
The cooking school is scheduled for early May, right on the heels of Kim, Colorado’s second annually scheduled ranch rodeo and around the time many area ranches hold spring brandings.

Rem and Stormie (Schumacher) Mosimann are hosting the Rollinses in a canyon on their sprawling ranch near Kim.

The two couples are longtime friends. Rem Mosimann first met Kent Rollins when he was working for the Bell Ranch in New Mexico and Rollins hired on as a seasonal cook.

“When you go 130 miles with a wagon, 100 horses and 3,000 calves to brand, the food is very important,” Mosimann recalled recently. “If it’s not good, the guys start disliking each other and getting on each other’s nerves.”

When Mosimann and his wife Stormie moved home to her family’s ranch, they offered Rollins an open invitation to come out sometime and do a cooking school on their scenic spread. With the idea finally taking shape, they are looking forward to introducing Kent and Shannon to the local ranchers, sharing some great food and picking up a few Dutch oven cooking tips of their own.

“Kent’s a great storyteller, but there’s no BS to it,” Rem Mosimann said. “It’s all real. All the stories in his cookbook are true. He’s been there and done that. He’s definitely not a fake chuckwagon cook.”

“Lots of people get this idea about what a cowboy is and the life we live,” Stormie adds. “Kent’s someone you are proud to let represent you. He’s just a good old cowboy, like someone you grew up with.”

Rollins’ wife Shannon describes Red River Ranch cooking schools as an immersive experience where tenderfoots and seasoned outdoorsmen are equally welcome.

“We set it up like the old cow camps we cook at on ranches, and everybody stays in tepees,” she said. “There’s no running water or modern conveniences.”

People have come from as far away as California, Minnesota and England to get a taste of the Old West.

“We get a lot of people who have never seen the stars come out or seen the sun go down,” Shannon explained. “It’s about so much more than cooking. The camaraderie that happens around the wagon is just incredible. We recreate that and that’s what people really love.”

“There was one guy who had worked in a cubicle all his life and didn’t have many close friends. His daughter got it for him as a retirement gift. He cried when he left. He had never felt so close to a group of people,” she recalled. “This spring we have a couple who will be celebrating their 40th anniversary.”

Those looking to get away from it all could hardly do better than Kim, which is at least three hours from the nearest major airport.

As for the economic impact the visitors will have on the community of Kim during their stay, Rem Mossimann expects it to be minimal.

“They might be able to buy a pair of gloves if they need something to handle the hot Dutch ovens with, but other than that you can’t really do much business in Kim,” he said with a laugh. “If they didn’t have tents to stay in, they’d be up a creek.”