Rex Ryan has walked that line and now is laughing all the way to the AFC Championship game.

Some might find Ryan’s act obnoxious, but he’s instilled a confidence in the New York Jets that has not been seen since Bill Parcells strolled along the Gang Green sidelines.

There is a very fine line between confidence and overconfidence.

Rex Ryan has walked that line and now is laughing all the way to the AFC Championship game.
Some might find Ryan’s act obnoxious, but he’s instilled a confidence in the New York Jets that has not been seen since Bill Parcells strolled along the Gang Green sidelines.

If people want to believe Ryan is just a big, overconfidence blowhard that will soon get what’s coming to him, that’s fine. I’d rather portray him as refreshing and somebody that might finally rid the Jets franchise of its inferiority complex with the New York Giants.

It started when Ryan declared he wouldn’t “kiss Bill Belichick’s rings,” and most recently he declared the Jets as the favorite to win the Super Bowl.

Over the top? Perhaps, but why not be a believer in your own team to the fans and media? Why should coaches regurgitate the same tired mantra of “We are going to face a great challenge this week, and blah, blah, blah.”

It’s not about getting great quotes from an NFL head coach, it’s about how he and the Jets are perceived and they are seen as a team that isn’t afraid of anybody. That’s how it should be.

Ryan has wanted his team to respect everybody, but fear no one. They may not beat the Indianapolis Colts this Sunday, but nobody, even rookie quarterback Mark Sanchez, will be overwhelmed seeing Peyton Manning, Reggie Wayne and Dwight Freeney on the opposite side.

Too many coaches and players have a fear of providing “bulletin board material” to another team, but Ryan has shown you can talk tough without being disrespectful to an opponent.

It’s fitting Ryan came to the Jets when he did, because he instills an attitude not seen from the franchise before, and might finally be able to break free of the large shadow constantly cast by the Giants.

Every day the Jets have come to work for the last 25 years and seen “Giants Stadium” as they drive up to their home office. Next season, the teams will again be sharing a stadium, but it will not be called Giants Stadium.

What corporate giant buys the naming rights of the new stadium remains to be seen, but playing in a place that bears another team’s name has hurt the Jets and been a sore subject for the fan base desperately wanting to separate itself from the Giants.

Same old Bills?

Chan Gailey will hardly get the juices flowing among Bills’ fans, but he deserves the benefit of the doubt, right? Well, maybe, but that doesn’t mean the perception of the move will not be “same old Bills.”

It seems like they really did try to get the huge name like Bill Cowher, but he just didn’t want the gig. They tried to interview some other assistants and they said no. The problem with the move is that Ralph Wilson promised big change and so far we are still waiting for the house cleaning.

Misreading the market

More and more we are seeing baseball free agents entering the new year unsigned and agents misreading the market or just being plain arrogant about their client have to take the blame. A great example is Johnny Damon, who should have been a cinch to re-sign with the New York Yankees. However, agent Scott Boras stood firm on getting Damon three or four years and banked on the Yankees being there to leverage another team. The Yankees had their own stance — they wanted Damon back for a year or two at their price — and have not moved off that.

Boras may have expected the Atlanta Braves or San Francisco Giants, to name a few, would swoop in and give Damon the years and money he expected. That hasn’t happened and now a veteran with 20-home run, 20-steal potential still in him is unemployed with no signs of that changing.

The dysfunctional Mets

The Carlos Beltran situation is proving the New York Mets are not a cursed franchise or simple suffering from forgotten child syndrome because of the New York Yankees. They are just a dysfunctional, poorly run franchise.

They send their assistant general manager on a conference call with reporters to dodge questions about a surgery to one of the team’s start players with no real knowledge of what actually happened. Where was Omar Minaya?

The 2010 season hasn’t even started yet, but it’s looking a lot like 2009 already.

Paul Jannace writes for the Daily Reporter in Wellsville, N.Y. This column is the opinion of the writer and not of the newspaper.